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Omega Juicer 8006 is a Great Gadget for Health Conscious Geeks

omega juicer

The Omega Juicer 8006 – What is This Thing?

Omega Juicer 8006 is a juicing machine that looks nothing like what many consumers think of as a juicer.   When most people think of juicers, they think of those loud machines that produce a very frothy juice, sound like a jet engine, and shoot produce pulp out the back at rocket speeds.  They are very noisy, and forget about using them late at night or in a multi dwelling such as an apartment building during anything but peak dinner hours.

The biggest drawback, and I will say it up front, for most people, will be the price.  Most people are used to very cheap appliances and being able to go the local store and pick up new kitchen gadgets for $50-$100.  The average Omega juicer in this range will set you back around $300.  Well, it’s a quality machine.  It’s very quiet too.  Let’s explain the concept.

omega juicer

 

Omega Juicer 8006 – An Auger Masticating Juicer

So what is an auger masticating juicer?

Well, it uses an electric motor that spins at a slow speed, and it’s very quiet.  It uses an auger, which is a very hard corkscrew like appendage, which lives inside a plastic tube.  The screw like appearance isn’t just for looks.  It takes the produce in at the start, through a hole, and then pushes it through the screw turning towards a part of the internals where the produce is cut, crushed, and then squeezed to the point that the liquid is separated from the pulp.  The liquid comes out one hole and into a liquid collection cup, while the pulp exits another opening and into a pulp collection vessel.  It turns slow, transfers no heat or oxygen to the juice, thus keeping the juice healthier and able to stand a bit longer before being consumed.

 

Regular centrifugal juicers transfer heat to the juice, and through the rapid spinning also oxygenate the juice, thus increasing the rate of degradation.  The juice needs to be consumed immediately and it can’t really be kept for long, even refrigerated.  Auger juicers’ juice can be stored and refrigerated longer than centrifugal juicer juices.

These juicers also squeeze more juice out of the produce, generally speaking.  They really push that produce in and squeeze the bejesus out of it.

 

Another thing that they do that the centrifugal juicers can’t is that they can juice things with less resistance, like leafy greens and things like wheat grass.  Have you ever tried to juice these things in the centrifugal models?  You can’t.  You end up wasting it all.



 

The Omega Juicer 8006 – More than Juice

One of the greatest things about this machine is that it’s actually MORE than just a juicer.  How many of us have purchased gadgets that are single taskers only to give up on the task they we bought the darn thing for only to have it sit there unused until we give it away or throw it out?

Well, even if you give up on juicing, or don’t juice regularly, this machine can do a lot more than make juice.

This machine can make nut butters.  Yes, with the proper attachment, and it comes with several, you can pop in nuts and have nut butter and nut juice (nut milk) come out.  Tis means healthy things like peanut butter, cashew butter, almond butter, etc.

 

That’s not all! (I feel like Ron Popeil here)

You can make baby foods from things like bananas, and boiled sweet potatoes and yams.

 

You can do things with dried fruits.

What else?

Pasta.  You can make homemade pastas with the several attachments.  I have tried it and it actually works better with two people, but I was able to make several shaped long pastas with the attachments that it comes with.  It cooked up and tasted great.  There’s nothing like homemade linguine, I can tell you!

 

It comes with an attachment that makes a very thick dough extrusion which is great for a pretzel recipe.  Out comes the dough in that thickness and you can twist it into the shaped pretzel that you desire.  How cool is that?!

 

The Omega Juicer 8006 – Any Drawbacks?

 

Not on the device itself.  It’s built like a tank.

I’d say that the major drawback for most people would be price.  ~$300 is a lot for many,  and they just won’t devote that to a kitchen gadget that they aren’t sure that they would even use beyond the novelty period.

I will report to you, however, that it’s a quality machine and it’s very well built and easy to clean after each use.

 

The other drawback would be that you lose the pulp, or much of the produce that you pay for.  This is true of any juicer of any type, just due to the way the device operates.  Many people today are turning to the new high speed blenders that can blend the entire volume of produce with some water, and they feel that they are getting the fiber and not throwing away so much of the good in the produce.

There are some reasons why juicing is good too, and many people might benefit from the juice at certain times of the day, like morning,w hen a quick infusion of goodness without the fiber bulk would be useful.  Also, not consuming all of the fiber all of the time would be less gassy or bulky for many.  Ideally it would be great to have both devices and then you use each when it makes the most sense, but I’ll concede that many people are looking for one silver bullet when it comes to this type of thing.

Summary: Omega Juicer 8006

Think about all of the benefits:

  1. Quieter
  2. Better quality juice
  3. More juice since it squeezes more out of the produce
  4. Ability to juice things like wheat grass and leafy greens
  5. Able to make nut butters
  6. Doubles as a pasta & pretzel maker
  7. Can help make baby food
  8. Easy to clean
  9. Great retro look
  10. Very durable electric motor

 

The Omega Juicer 8006 is an all around winner for your kitchen.  You should really go out and try one, or read up on the auger juicing method if you’re just not convinced yet.  These things are sold in most big stores that carry such appliances, and then there is always Amazon.com!

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